Interview With Kyle Kogut

Could you give us a brief introduction to who you are and what kind of work you make?
My name is Kyle Kogut. I’m 25 and originally hailing from Philadelphia, PA where I got my BFA in Printmaking from Tyler School of Art. Currently I live in Baltimore. MD and am in my second year of graduate school at MICA in the Mount Royal School of Art interdisciplinary program. My practice is rooted in painting, drawing and printmaking but has more recently expanded to sculpture, video, and installation. 

Where do you gather most of the inspiration for your works?
My work is heavily autobiographic and explores personal histories of my family in an attempt to connect my experiences to a larger universality of the human experience. Serving as a platform to scrutinize my mortality and seemingly pointlessness of life, my work explores existential philosophies and the indifference of nature.

What is your most important artist tool? Is there something you can’t live without in your studio?
Nothing beats a pencil; it seems to be the foundation for everything. 

What types of obstacles have you run into in your artistic practice and how do you go about navigating around them?
One of the biggest obstacles is getting too comfortable and being hesitant to explore a concept or material. Being honest with and dedicated to your work is the foundation for a healthy art practice, so at the end of the day I try to always trust my gut. 
 

Monument Metal, wood, hand dyed fabric 38 x 78 x 62 in.

Monument
Metal, wood, hand dyed fabric
38 x 78 x 62 in.

What do you feel are the recurring themes in your visual work?  
My work explores death and work. Contemplating the futility of life and labor, I translate these morbid themes through a pastel guise, often set against a backdrop of an Americana working class identity.

Confession Oil, hand-dyed felt on panel 60 x 26 x 2 in.

Confession
Oil, hand-dyed felt on panel
60 x 26 x 2 in.

Is there a particular artist you feel you relate to? Who are your role models (artists or non-artist)?
My work is heavily influenced by the Northern Renaissance; Hieronymus Bosch, Lucas Cranach the Elder, and Albrecht Dürer to name a few. Picasso's Vollard Suite, Odilon Redon's drawings, and everything Guston did are also staples. Contemporary artists that I admire are Trenton Doyle Hancock, Tom Holmes, Allison Shulnik, and David Lynch among many others. My parents are my role models for their work ethic and support that they’ve given me throughout my life.

What is the best piece of artistic advice you’ve been given?
The life of the artist is a marathon, not a sprint.

Untitled (Burden) Stone, molded concrete, and hand dyed fabric 24 x 20 x 22 in.

Untitled (Burden)
Stone, molded concrete, and hand dyed fabric
24 x 20 x 22 in.